PlayStation Boss seems to be unphased about the growing number of Xbox Game Pass Subscribers

While Xbox Game Pass has become a key component of Microsoft’s current strategy, PlayStation CEO Jim Ryan seemed unconcerned about the subscription programme. During a Q&A with PlayStation employees, Ryan was quick to discount the strength of Game Pass, according to Insider Gaming sources. During that session, Ryan estimated the number of Game Pass users to be in the 20 million range, which he observed is less than the number of PlayStation 5 consoles sold in the last two years.

“When we consider Game Pass, it seems to be getting lower [Game Pass numbers]. When we consider Game Pass, we’ve sold more PS5’s in two years than they have gathered subscribers and they’ve been doing that for 6-7 years,” Ryan reportedly said. “We’re just shy of 50 million subscribers and they are in the low 20s, but there’s more work to do to grow that number.”

PlayStation
credit: comicbook.com

One of the most intriguing aspects of Ryan’s remarks is that they come at a time when Sony has been vocal in its opposition to Microsoft’s acquisition of Activision Blizzard. Despite Microsoft’s vow to maintain Call of Duty on PlayStation for at least the next ten years, Ryan has publicly opposed the acquisition, citing the negative effects on competition and the unfair advantage it would provide Microsoft. However, this comment implies that he is unconcerned about Xbox as a rival, particularly Game Pass.

Obviously, Xbox Game Pass customers stand to gain significantly if the Activision Blizzard merger is completed; it may significantly increase the value of the programme! Given the company’s position behind Sony and Nintendo, Microsoft has claimed that the transaction will help Xbox become more competitive. It’s unlikely that this comment would influence people opposed to the transaction, but it’s interesting to see how Jim Ryan feels.

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